12 Ways to Join In!

Look! A listicle! CV here, unfolding a conversation between me and Lex as we planned the first Feminism In Practice Salon…  

Lex and I would love for FeministsAtWork to be an open platform for anyone who’d like to participate in a conversation that takes feminism into the workplace and directs it at the systems that get in the way of justice and equality within organizations. This salon event is only one of a zillion ways we can work together. Just tweeting about the event and bringing a friend (oh, that’s #12) are great ways to join in. But what if you want to do more?

There are (at least) 11 12 different ways you can join in with FeministsAtWork: 

  1. Convene an event
  2. Host at an event
  3. Writing and cross-posting on the FeministsAtWork blog
  4. Make and sell things that inspire activism and help pay for events
  5. Welcome and connect personally with other feminists who join in
  6. Bring resources to the group and to each other
  7. “Network weaving”– help people meet each other to expand the network
  8. Bring a topic up for discussion (online, at an event, between us)
  9. Bring an example or issue to the group for problem-solving and support
  10. Listening bravely to what others have to share
  11. Organize a sip & share (shout out to Wonder Women of Boston for this idea, check out their model)

1. Convene an event

Anyone is welcome to convene an event under the name “FeministsAtWork” and connect with the folks in our network. We have a few principles that anything called “FeministsAtWork” must follow (e.g., be intersectional, be inclusive, be welcoming, be emotionally safe), but beyond that it’s up to you and whoever attends to set the agenda. If you want to create an event, email us and we’ll do our best to help you.

2. Host at an event

“Convening” is the organizing and planning of an event, and “hosting” is the in-person, in-real-time shepherding/stewarding of the interaction. Sometimes it’s easier to separate these roles. We’ll be looking for people to host additional events, so if you want to host something but need help with convening, let us know.

3. Writing and cross-posting on the FeministsAtWork blog

lolcatWe’re so lucky that there are great feminist blogs out there (e.g., EverydayFeminism, CrunkFeminists, GeekFeminism, and so many more), so we don’t feel like we need to create a big, comprehensive feminist blog. We do want to use this blog and site to share, showcase, recommend, and offer an outlet for others who are writing about feminism and feminist practice. And of course we’ll use this blog to keep folks up to date on what we all are up to.  If you’d like to write something for this blog or cross-post something you’ve placed elsewhere, email Lex at lex@feministsatwork.com.

4. Make and sell things that inspire activism and help pay for events

I wish that someone would make a t-shirt that says ‘On Wednesdays We Smash the Kyriarchy’. Or make stickers that read “iFeminism is Cool”. I’d also like a small pot of petty cash from which we can purchase coffee, chocolate, and feminist supplies. Just thought I’d throw that out there.

5. Welcome and connect personally with other feminists that join in

Personally, I kind of freak out when I walk into a meetup alone. (Probably one too many tech events where I’m one of the only ladypersons and certainly the only one over 40.) Thus, I personally love it when people take up the challenge of welcoming and weaving into the conversation people who are new to the group.

6. Bring resources to the group and to each other

All activists and change agents have resources they draw upon to stay centered, get engaged, and make progress. If you have texts, tools, links, events, kitten gifs, or anything else that inspires you that you’d like to share, we welcome it. Tell us what it is and how we can help you share it.

7.  “Network weaving”: help people meet each other to expand the network

Another area where we are blessed/lucky/making progress is in creating communities, clusters, and loose networks of people who are working alongside us for similar kinds of goals. If you know of a community we should connect with – yay. (We’ve already had two groups reach out to suggest co-convening events). Also – and here’s an especially powerful way to participate – if you know a few folks who should know each other, please introduce them. There is a special place in heaven, as well as in this world, for people who connect people.

8. Bring a topic up for discussion (online, at an event, between us)

What would you like us to address next? What’s important to you and on your agenda?

9. Bring an example or issue to the group for problem-solving and support

At our first FeminismInPractice Salon, we’ve asked everyone to bring an example of when they’ve demonstrated/employed/advocated for feminism at work. (We know you’ve all done it.) Concrete examples help us translate the seemingly abstract ideas of “intersectionality” and “kyriarchy” into actions like “advocating for better pay for hourly workers even though we’re managers” and “challenging racial as well as gender gaps in pay.” Plus, what are feminist friends for if not to give you help with real world problems?

tumblr_m1bc0mtukp1r9fbgko1_40010. Listen bravely to what others have to share

Keeping it real here: Sometimes I don’t want to hear about how white women have historically excluded women of color, or how my managerial and leadership-oriented advice doesn’t work for a parent at home with kids, or how my academic language is too snooty to be intelligible or useful. But I take a deep breath and focus, and listen, because listening is a way we learn and a way we love. Being listened to and really being heard is a gift we’d all like to receive, and we are all able to give.

11. Organize a sip & share

Of course this idea comes from Boston, where Jeanne Dasaro and the Wonder Women of Boston team have been agitating and advocating around glasses of wine. A sip & share is a lightweight gathering to talk, conspire, get to know each other, etc. Anyone can toss out a date, time, place, and topic where they will be and were others can meet up, and if 2 other people rsvp ‘yes’, it’s an event. Kind of like a minyan for feminists, having 3 people makes it a “group” and not just you and a pal sloshing down the Pellegrino.

12. Bring a friend

How. Did. I. Miss. This. One. I only found it when I went back to edit the draft! Bring a friend. Bring two friends. Bring someone you’d like to become better friends with. You might ask, how did Lex and I meet in person, and become friends? We met at a women-in-tech event, that friends invited us to. How did you find this page? Probably… wait for it… a friend invited you.

We invite you to invite others. Bring a friend, connect your friend to the group, ask your friend to join in.  

And of course, the bonus way to participate – add a comment, below.

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